ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION


EXTERIOR


Pavilion I is located at the northwest corner of the Lawn at the head of the west range. Its front facade consists of a three-bay, two-story, gable-roofed structure with a pedimented portico. The rear, five-bay facade has a slightly narrower first floor and basement addition with a low hip roof that was built circa 1850.

The portico on the front facade uses the Doric order based on that of the Roman Theater of Marcellus as illustrated in Roland Fréart de Chambray's Parallèlle de l'architecture antique avec la moderne . The columns have attic bases on plinths, unfluted shafts, and Doric capitals; the bases and capitals are stone and the shafts are stuccoed brick. The wooden entablature (5' 5-3/8" deep) has a two-fascia architrave, a frieze with alternating triglyphs and metopes (each ornamented with a face surrounded by radiating rays), and a denticulated cornice. The wooden pediment above the entablature has a nineteen-light, semicircular window with a two-fascia architrave (Type T-18) in the center and is capped with a raking cornice.

The deep entablature of the portico (with plain instead of ornamented metopes) is carried around the three remaining sides of the original structure as a unifying element. Above the entablature, there is a recent standing-seam terneplate roof with a built-in gutter near the eave line. The original chimney, near the center of the building, projects seven courses above the ridge, corbels back two courses, continues up fifteen courses, and ends in a four-course brick cap.

A shallower (2' 2-1/2") wooden entablature, with a two-fascia architrave, frieze, and unornamented cornice, caps the addition to the west. The hip roof above has a standing-seam terneplate roof (seams spaced 17-1/4" apart and 8' pans). There are two original chimneys, one on the north and one on the south. The south chimney is mortared over; the north chimney has a metal cap with galvanized screening. Flashing around the chimneys and at the joint between the roof and the wall is copper. Near the center of the roof is a skylight (2' 10" wide by 5' 5" long). The wire glass light at the top of the skylight slopes towards the north.


The east facade is deeply recessed behind the columns of the portico. A porch extending to about one foot from the back of the columns at the second story level is supported from the portico ceiling structure by iron rods. The railing at the edge of the porch has base and top rails with solid panels behind the columns and light wood members forming diamonds and triangles between. The railing is of Chinese inspiration by way of English pattern books.

The original red brick of the facade is laid in Flemish bond with king closers at the window openings and queen closer at the ends. The handmade bricks vary in size; they are approximately 2-5/8" high by 7-7/8" long and laid so that six courses including joints equal approximately 1' 5-3/4". The mortar in the narrow joints is slightly recessed at the edges and nearly even with the surface of the brick in the center. Much of the mortar under the portico, where it has been protected from the weather, appears to be original. There are traces of a red wash and white penciling that were applied to the brick facade at some time.


The floor of the portico on the first story is recently laid brick in herringbone pattern; the ceiling above is beaded tongue-and-groove boards running east-west with a modern light fixture attached to it. Two wooden steps lead to the original quartzite threshold of the doorway of the center bay. The original entrance door (Type D-l), set in a panelled reveal, has two leaves, each with four panels (two wood panels at the bottom, a glass panel, and a wood panel with a glass insert at the top). Each of the side bays has a window (6/6 double-hung sash). The articulation of the second story is similar to that of the first with a door in the center bay and windows (6/6 double-hung sash) in the side bays. Doors and windows, including the windows in the basement (3-light hinged sash), are surrounded by architraves of similar profiles (fillet, cyma recta, and two fasciae) but varying widths (8" at the doors and 6-l/2'' at windows). The windows on both floors and the door on the first floor are also flanked by blinds, louvered with a center rail, mounted on strap hinges and held against the wall with holdbacks. Holes in the masonry indicate that earlier holdbacks were located closer to the blinds. There is a relatively recent iron latch on the blinds for the entrance door.

The second-story porch has a floor of random-width tongue-and-groove boards (4-1/4" to 5-3/4" running east-west) that slopes slightly to the east for drainage. At the south end, the floor and the steps leading down from it to the colonnade deck are covered with painted terneplate. The profile on the edge of the porch is the same as that of the architraves around the windows and doors. The porch ceiling is made of tongue-and-groove boards running east-west. There is a small molding (cavetto, fillet and ovolo) where the ceiling meets the wall. On the brick facade behind, holes about six feet above the floor near the south end indicate that something was attached at this location in the past. Two wooden steps lead to the doorway in the center. There is a two-panel screen door with three spring hinges, a pull, and a hook and eye on the interior. The original stile-and-rail door behind (Type D-14) has two leaves each with two raised and beveled panels and one glass pane at the top.


The north facade has the original two upper floors and basement structure to the east and the circa-1850 one upper floor and basement addition to the west. The north facade of the original building has three windows in the basement (one towards the front and two near the rear- the Jefferson plan illustrates only the middle window), two on the first floor (above the two rear windows below), and three on the second floor (over those in the basement). The facade of the addition has one window in the basement and two windows on the first story. All the windows on this facade have 6/6 sash except for the east basement window, which has one nine-light sash.

The brick on the north facade of the original structure are rougher than those of the east facade. They vary widely in size around 7-1/2" long by 2-3/8" wide and are laid so that eight courses equal approximately 2' 0-3/8". They are toothed into the front wall in an irregular manner. Above the header course at the water table, the brick are laid in Flemish bond; below the water table, the brick are generally laid in Liverpool bond (one header course to every three stretcher courses), but some irregularities suggest alterations. The brick on the extension is different from that of the original structure. Below the header course at the level of the first floor window sills, it is generally laid in American common bond; above the header course it is laid in Flemish bond.


There are three downspouts on this facade: one at each end of the original pavilion and one at the rear of the addition. Nails near the west end of the addition indicate that sheet metal was nailed to the brick in the vicinity of the leader. There is a small piece of metal still attached to the wall.

The west facade is five bays wide with two windows on either side of a central door to the basement of the circa-1850 addition and five windows in both the first floor of the addition and the second floor of the original structure. Above the entablature on the Jefferson portion, there is a pediment with a semicircular window in an architrave surround and a raking cornice, similar to the pediment on the east facade. The doorway, surrounded by an architrave molding, has a screen door with a center rail and brass screen top and bottom. There is a wire grid behind the screen in the lower opening. The screen has two 3-1/2" butts and a lock and latch. The stile-and-rail door behind (Type D-21) has six raised and beveled panels.

The brick on the west facade of the original structure is similar to that of the north and south and laid in American common bond. The brick on the west wall of the addition is laid in American common bond throughout. There are vents (approximately 4-1/2" high by 5" wide) at the base of the wall; there is one vent north of the door and there are five equally spaced vents south of the door. Filled masonry openings at the level of the second floor indicate that there was an extension approximately 9' wide at the rear of the basement story. This extension is visible in the 1856 lithographic view of the campus from the west.


On the south facade, there are four windows in the original building (two in the basement, one on the first floor, and one on the second floor) and three windows and a door in the addition to the rear (a window and door in the basement and two windows on the first floor). All of the windows have 6/6 sash, and the windows in the first and second floors are flanked by blinds. The three basement windows are set in masonry openings topped with segmental relieving arches. The architraves of the windows on the first and second stories are similar to those around the windows on the north and west facades. The architraves around the basement windows are later (Type T-14). The doorway has a two-fascia architrave molding (Type T-16) recessed slightly behind the plane of the facade. The inner part of the molding (the fasciae) is well weathered and appears to be original; the outer portion of the molding is sharp and is more recent. The screen door has a center rail with brass screen top and bottom. It has a pair of 3-1/2" butts and a brass latch and keeper. The stile-and-rail door behind has four raised and beveled panels (Type D-23).

The brick on the south facade of the original structure is laid in Liverpool bond below the water table and in American common bond above. The one-story brick student rooms connect to Pavilion I at the east end of the south facade. There is a light fixture at the west end of the facade. There are three downspouts on this facade: one near the middle of the original structure that follows the roof of the lawn room, one at the rear of the original structure, and one at the rear of the addition.

A ghost on the masonry and small areas of brick infill around the doorway indicate that there was a projection over the doorway on this facade. A hole in the masonry west of the doorway indicates that there may have been a light fixture in this location. A ghost on the west end of this wall indicates that there was a structure attached. Repointed mortar joints show the locations of the pieces of stepped flashing for the sloping roof.

The investigation of the exterior painted elements of Pavilion I revealed upwards of fifteen layers of accumulated paint on some portions of the building. Wood elements including the cornices, pediments, window and door trim, and balcony were originally primed and painted in a yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/1). Accumulated dirt is evident between each succeeding application of paint. The yellowish white was also applied to the underside of the suspended porch, the porch balustrade, and the porch ceiling. The second floor porch deck was first painted in a moderate reddish brown ( 10 R 3/4).


The stone bases of the four stuccoed columns have approximately ten layers of paint with very evident layers of dirt between each layer of paint. The lesser number of paint layers and greater dirt build-up on stone surfaces, coupled with the appearance of these elements in an old photograph, indicates that they were originally unpainted. Some samples reveal traces of terra-cotta red on the stone surfaces of the column bases. Perhaps this color was splashed onto these elements at the time the brick facade was painted with red. The column shafts are covered by at least seven layers of paint. The first coat of paint was a yellowish white; the more recent layers tend to be a purer white. Initially, the stuccoed shafts may not have been painted.

The paired entrance doors at the first and second floors were originally grained to simulate mahogany. Later layers featured dark yellowish green (2.5 G 3/4).

The window blinds have approximately fourteen layers of accumulated paint. A light gray primer is followed by what appears to be a dark green and then a deep gray brown.


Investigation of the brick facade revealed that the masonry was at one point painted white followed by the application of a brownish orange (terra cotta) color. The mortar joints where then painted white. This condition is still visible on the protected wall surface facing the second floor porch.


INTERIOR

Pavilion I was examined and analyzed to document its existing condition, to determine where repairs are needed, and to provide a better understanding of the changes and modifications the building has undergone since its initial construction. Techniques used in the examination included visual investigation and description, measuring and drawing, and comprehensive photographic documentation of the building.


As most of this examination and analysis was undertaken while the structure was occupied, it was not possible to make major investigations behind finished surfaces. The subsurface investigations that were accomplished within these limitations included removal and replacement of floor boards on the first and second floors to examine structural conditions, removal and replacement of small sections of brick flooring in the basement, and removal and replacement of floor boards and knee wall sheathing in the attic. Access to the space above the lowered ceiling in the second floor bathrooms was gained through the hatch in the attic floor. Further information was gathered as workmen were preparing for the removal of the heating system after the occupants had left. At this time the construction of some of the basement walls was exposed.

Because it was not possible to do thorough subsurface investigations in all areas, it is important that elements and construction of the building exposed during future work be carefully documented. Information gained from such documentation may confirm or alter conclusions summarized below.


As part of the physical investigation of Pavilion I, a preliminary paint analysis was undertaken to determine the original paint schemes of the first and second floor rooms, selected basement rooms, and all exterior painted surfaces.

Two methods of investigation were used to determine the historic paint colors. These included microscopic analysis of small samples of paint removed from painted surfaces such as plaster walls and wood trim, as well as the actual removal of paint by scraping, layer by layer, and then visually inspecting the exposed colors using a hand-held magnifier. The two methods reinforced each other and acted as checks to minimize the possibility of error in the final color determination.


The microscopic analysis involved the collection of samples, approximately l/4" square, from the various painted surfaces using a scalpel. These samples were placed in small envelopes which were identified by location of sample and by any other pertinent information encountered during the collection process. The samples were then examined using a Bausch and Lomb Stereozoom 7 microscope to determine the number of paint layers and to identify colors. These colors were then matched to those found in the Munsell Book of Color: Matte Finish Collection and recorded using National Bureau of Standards nomenclature. Although for purposes of this study the original colors were of most concern, it was found that often later colors were of help in determining the development of a building chronology.

Vital components in the paint investigation process are the collection and study of written documentation dealing with the construction and habitation of the building after its initial construction and the study of early photographs of the interior and exterior. Unfortunately, little or no information has surfaced in either area. Although the various inhabitants are known, little information concerning their occupancy has been discovered. This is particularly so with the later nineteenth century and twentieth century occupants. Although, the paint analysis has revealed where changes were made in the various rooms, scarcity of documentation has made it impossible to develop an accurate chronology for these changes.


The lack of historic interior photographs, even recent photographs, makes it difficult to interpret decorative evidence discovered in the interior. Although all the surviving layers of wallpaper seem to date from the twentieth century, it is impossible to assign them to the period of a particular occupant. Photographs would be helpful in such a situation.


It should be stressed that further sampling must be undertaken during the restoration in order to develop a fuller understanding of the interior decorative schemes. This is particularly true for the plaster wall and ceiling surfaces, which are now obscured by layers of paper and paint. All the accumulation of wall and ceiling paper should be carefully removed and the plaster surfaces examined for traces of early paper or paint. This is especially important in the dining room (Room 103) where the initial decorative scheme may have included wallpaper.

BASEMENT


The basement is composed of two distinct areas, the original pavilion portion and the additional rooms found in the circa- 1850 rear wing. The slope of the site downward from front to back allows the rear addition to open directly onto grade and the garden.


The present room arrangement of the original front portion agrees with Jefferson's plan although there are several more windows today than there were originally and a partition that divided the north room (B3) was removed. The plan had a wide central hall extending the full depth of the pavilion, which duplicated the halls on the first and second floors. In general, original finishes included brick floors, plastered walls and ceilings, simple trim, and wood plank doors.

North of this hall were a large room and a small room. The smaller rear room with two windows may have served as a servant's bedroom. The larger front room, entered through a doorway set in the foundation of the lecture room fireplace, may have functioned as a storeroom.

The large south room was the household kitchen with a large cooking fireplace centered on the north wall. The stair hall was located in the southeast corner where it remains.

Paint Investigation : In general the basement surfaces were painted less often than those of the floors above. The initial investigation revealed the following information about the original paint schemes in the basement. Samples taken in the stair hall, Room B1, indicated that the first scheme consisted of white painted plaster walls and wood doors and trim covered in a light grayish brown (5 YR 6/2). The rough pink sand plaster walls were repainted in white about six times prior to having a pale orange/yellow introduced. About fourteen layers of paint have accumulated on the walls. The trim and doors have less paint build-up. The original finish was covered by a much deeper gray followed by a deep forest green. This green was the color that the Crispells in turn covered with several layers of white paint.

In the former kitchen, Room B4, the later nineteenth-century window trim was initially painted in a grayish reddish brown (10 R 2.5/2) followed by the forest green and white.


Paint finishes in the circa-1850 addition differ from those found in the earlier portion of the pavilion. In the present laundry room, Room B5, the trim was first painted in a yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2) followed by the familiar forest green, a cream, and the whites. The door (B72) was initially grained to resemble mahogany. This surface was later covered with a pale gray/green, a bright yellow, followed by about nine more layers. In the rear stair hall, Room B7, the original portions of the stairway were first painted a grayish reddish brown (10 R 2.5/2) followed by the forest green.

ROOM Bl FRONT STAIR HALL


The front stair hall is in the southeast corner of the original structure. There is a door to the front hall on the north and a door to the family room on the west.

Modifications made to the stair hall include the twentieth-century intrusion of piping for the heating system. This enters the pavilion in the southeast corner behind the stairs. The stair balustrade also dates from this century and may replace a partition which partially enclosed the stairway.

Floor : Brick in running bond running east-west. Brick are 4" x 8" set in sand with mortar applied to the faces of the joints. Some areas have been patched. The stairway foot rests on a large rectangular stone set into the brick floor (original).

Ceiling : Painted plaster.

Walls : Original plaster over masonry, painted.

Baseboard : On west wall only from door to north: 6-1/4" high ending in a quirk and a flush bead (Type B-2).

Doors : Two painted doors with architrave surrounds; the architrave of the west door (Type T-6) is slightly more complex than that of the north door (Type T-10).

No. B11: Original vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board with three horizontal battens (Type D-19). Hardware: Original pair of 12" high wrought-iron H-L hinges and later iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

No. B12: Original vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board with three horizontal battens (Type D-19). Hardware: Original pair of 12" high wrought-iron H-L hinges and later iron box lock with brass knobs.

Windows : One original window with one inswinging three-light sash on two 2-1/2" hinges. Pane size 10" x 12", muntin size 5/8". Original internal window opening on west wall with architrave (Type T-7) and original wooden louvers in top portion. Louvers removed from lower section.

Stairway : Closed-string stairs with ten risers leading up along east wall to winders at south end. Risers are 8" high (after two lower risers which are 9-3/4" and 6-3/4", respectively); treads are 10 5/8". The later balusters are 1" x 1-1/8'' spaced approximately 5-1/4" o.c. on the 1" x 3-1/8" board that tops the stringer. The bottom of the face of the stringer is finished with a quirk and a flush bead. The simple rail and the 3-1/8" x 2-3/4" newel are mahogany. This handrail may have replaced a partition which enclosed the stair.

Heating : Welded five-pipe L-shaped heating unit suspended from ceiling (20th century).

Lighting : Ceiling fixture with 7" diameter cream-colored translucent glass globe (recent).

Equipment : Electrical service with a disconnect switch on both sides of line fused at 250 amps and a 40 position distribution panel with a 200 amp breaker (20th century).

ROOM B2 FRONT HALL

Other than the addition of twentieth-century piping this hall retains its early-nineteenth-century character. The front hall is at the east end of the building under the front hall of the first floor. There are doors to the stair hall and family room on the south and to the recreation room on the north. There is a doorway to the rear stair hall on the west.

Floor : Brick in running bond running north-south. Brick are 3-3/4" x 7-3/4" with joints of approximately 1/2". Joints are pointed with later portland cement mortar. There has been some brick replacement.

Ceiling : Plaster on lath, painted.

Walls : Plaster on masonry, painted.

Doors : Four original openings with architrave surrounds (Type T-10). The architrave of the east door in the south wall ends with a quirk and bead (Type T-6)

No. B11: Original vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board with three horizontal battens (Type D-19). Hardware: Original pair of 12" high wrought-iron H-L hinges and later iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

No. B21: Original vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board (5"+_ ) with three horizontal battens (Type D-19). Hardware: Original pair of 12" high H-L hinges and later iron box lock with brass knobs.

No. B31: Original vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board (5"+_ ) with three horizontal battens (Type D-19). Hardware: Original pair of 12" high H-L hinges and later iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

No. B22: Original vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board (5"+_ ) with three horizontal battens (Type D-19). Hardware: Original pair of 12" high H-L hinges and later iron box lock with brass knobs.

Lighting : Two ceiling fixtures, each with 7" diameter flattened translucent globe (recent).

Equipment : Rheem electric water heater Model No. 666H-82D 826AL (recent).

Other Features : Door B21 leads to closet created from space within the chimney foundation. The Crispells covered over the opening on the Room B3 side.

ROOM B3 RECREATION ROOM


The Jefferson plan shows this room, which now occupies the whole north side of the original structure, divided by a north-south partition located about one foot from the west end of the chimney foundation. The larger room had a single window which would correspond to the present middle window on the north wall. The smaller room had two windows in the west wall. One of these windows survives and now looks into the modern laundry room in the circa-1850 wing. The room has a door to the front hall on the south. There are recent built-in cabinets along the south wall.

Floor : Concrete with steel trowel finish.

Ceiling : Plaster on lath, painted.

Walls : Original plaster on masonry. South and west walls are covered with tackboard (recent).

Doors : One original painted door with architrave surround (Type T-10).

No. B31: Original vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board (5"+_ ) with three horizontal battens (Type D-19). Hardware: Original pair of 12" high H-L hinges and later iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

Windows : Three windows along the north wall and one on the east wall. On the north wall only the middle window may be original. A window in the original structure on the west wall, with architrave surround (T-6), has been converted into a pass-through. Windows on north wall are set in deep plastered recesses. The two north windows to the west have 6/6 sash (pane size 9" x 12", muntin size 5/8"); the bottom sash moves but there is no counterbalancing mechanism. Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail. The original window opening on the east has a nine-pane fixed sash (pane size 18" x 9", muntin size 3/4").

Heating : 4" diameter hot-water pipe approximately 1' 6" below ceiling and 3' from north wall (20th century).

Lighting : Two rice paper and string globes (approximately 1' 6" in diameter) centered at approximate quarter points of room (late 20th century).

Other Features : Built-in cabinets along the south wall (recent). The 7' 5-1/2" wide brick chimney base projects into space. The center portion of the base is hollowed out to form a 2' 11" wide by 7' 5-1/2" high by 2' 6-1/4" deep arch with shelves.

ROOM B4 FAMILY ROOM


This large room in the southwest corner of the original structure behind the front stair hall is the original kitchen, which served the professor living on the first and second floors. Jefferson's original basement floor plan indicates that there was a single window in the south wall directly opposite the fireplace. A single door and window were located in the west rear wall. The louvered window opening into the stair hall is not apparent in the original plan although it seems to be an original feature. The large cooking fireplace survives with the iron brackets which supported a large pot crane.

The room has a door to the stair hall, a door to the front hall on the north, and a door to the south hall on the west.

Floor : Original brick in running bond running north-south. Brick are 3-3/4" x 7-3/4" with portland cement mortar joints of approximately 1/2". Some of the brick have been replaced.

Ceiling : Original plaster on lath.

Walls : Original plaster on masonry.

Doors : Three painted doors, two with architrave surrounds (east door, Type T-10; north door, Type T-6); west door is set in a plastered recess.

No. B12: Original vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board with three horizontal battens (Type D-19). Hardware: Original pair of 12" high H-L hinges and later iron box lock with brass knobs.

No. B22: Original vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board (5"+_ ) with three horizontal battens (Type D-19). Hardware: Original pair of 12" high H-L hinges and later iron box lock with brass knobs.

No. B93: Tongue-and-groove beaded board (6"+_ ) with three horizontal battens (Type D-24). Hardware: One pair of 3-3/8" butts and one iron box lock and strike with brass knobs. This opening was originally a window.


Windows : Two windows on south wall with architraves (Type T-15 except for modified architrave (Type T-14) at west side of west window) at the sides and top. The west window is a later-nineteenth-century addition. Both windows are of greater height than the original windows. Each window has 6/6 double ropehung sash, pane size 12" x 12", muntin size 3/4". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail. Original window opening on east wall with architrave (Type T-7) and original wooden louvers in top portion.

Fireplace : The 8' 6-1/4" wide chimney breast projects 2' 1-1/2" from the north wall. The face of the chimney breast is plaster without ornament. The brick-lined fireplace opening (5' 0" wide by 2' 1-1/2" deep) is topped by a segmental arch (4' 6" high at the sides and 5' 7-1/4" high at the center). Iron brackets to support a large pot crane.

Heating : 4" diameter hot water pipe suspended from ceiling parallel to south wall (20th century).

ROOM B5 LAUNDRY ROOM


The two doorways opening into this large room from the central hall indicate that this space was initially divided into two rooms. This room, the central hall, and the bedroom south of the hall are located in the rear addition constructed circa 1850. The two-story wing including these rooms may have replaced a single story structure constructed in 1832 for accommodation of domestics.

This room in the northwest corner of the building has two doors to the rear stair hall on the south wall and a window pass-through to the recreation room on the east wall. There is a bathroom in the southwest corner of the room.

Floor : Carpet over concrete with steel trowel finish (recent).

Ceiling : Plaster on lath, painted.

Walls : Original plaster on masonry, painted.

Doors : Three painted doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-6).

No. B51: Stile-and-rail door with two flat recessed panels (Type D-22) (20th century). Hardware: One pair of 3-1/2" butts, one mortise lock and strike (recent) .

No. B71: Vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board (5"+_ ) with three horizontal battens (Type D-18). Hardware: One pair of 3-1/2" butts and one iron box lock with brass knobs.

No. B72: Circa-1850 stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-20). Hardware: Original pair of 4" butts and iron box lock and keeper.

Windows : Two original windows. Window on north wall, surrounded by a simple molding (Type T-14), has recent 6/6 sash without cords or balances (pane size 9" x 12", muntin size 3/4"). There is a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail. A dryer vent has been inserted in one of the panes. The window on the west wall has an architrave surround (Type T-15) and 3/6 sash without cords or balances (pane size 12" x 12", muntin size 5/8"). There is a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail. The window opening in the wall of the original building to the east has an architrave molding (Type T-12) and is filled with blinds.

Heating : 4" hot water line approximately 1' 4" below ceiling and 2' 6" from north and west walls (20th century).

Lighting : Two 11" diameter translucent white glass spheres suspended approximately 1' from ceiling (recent).

Plumbing : Stainless steel bar sink ( 1' 3" x 1 ' 3" rim and 10" x 12" bowl). Hot and cold water and waste connections for washing machine (recent).

Other Features : The wood cabinet in the southwest corner and the upside down shelving unit against the east wall belong together. They date from the early twentieth century and were removed from the pantry, Room 110, by the Crispells.

ROOM B6 BATHROOM

The bathroom is in the southwest corner of the laundry room.

Floor : Carpet over concrete with steel trowel finish (recent).

Ceiling : Painted plaster on lath.

Walls : Painted plaster on masonry.

Doors : One painted door with architrave surround (Type T-6).

No. B51: Twentieth-century stile-and-rail door with two flat recessed panels (Type D-22). Hardware: Original pair of 3-1/2" butts, mortise lock and strike, and one hook and eye.

Windows : One window in west wall with simple molding surround (Type T-13). Window has 3/6 double-hung sash, pane size 12" x 12", muntin size 5/8". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Heating : One two-section, one-column hot water radiator suspended from ceiling (20th century).

Lighting : One suspended ceiling fixture with ribbed, white translucent globe (recent).

Plumbing : White porcelain, floor-mounted, two-piece water closet. Five foot white enameled cast-iron bathtub with shower fixture. 18" diameter countermounted lavatory with rim and lavatory faucet (recent).

Other Features : 21-1/2" deep x 4'-0" long painted wood vanity with plastic laminate top (recent).

ROOM B7 REAR STAIR HALL


This stair hall is an original feature of the circa-1850 addition. The stairway was originally enclosed. The balustrade was installed by the Crispells when they removed the enclosure. There is a doorway to the front hall on the east, a door to the bedroom on the south, a door to the garden on the west, and two doors to the laundry room on the north.

Floor : Carpet over concrete (recent).

Ceiling : Original plaster on lath.

Walls : Original plaster on masonry.

Doors : Four painted doors and a doorway with architrave surrounds. Each architrave is different: Doorway on east wall, Type T-12; west door, Types T-4 and T-6; south door, Type T-4; north wall west door and north wall east door, Type T-13.

No. B71: Vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board (5"+_ ) with three horizontal battens (Type D-18). Hardware: One pair of 3-1/2" butts and one iron box lock with brass knobs.

No. B72: Circa-1850 stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-20). Hardware: One pair of 4" butts and one iron box lock and keeper.

No. B 7 3: Twentieth-century stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-21). Hardware: One pair of 5" butts, mortise lock and strike with brass knobs and thumb latch, and cylinder lock (contemporary with door).

No. B81: Circa-1850 stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-10). Hardware: One pair of 3" butts and one iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

Stairway : Circa-1850 open-string stairs with fifteen risers to first floor (bottom riser is 5-3/4" high; remaining risers are 6-1/4" high). Treads are 2' 10-3/4" long and 10" wide with a 1" nosing. The recent rail and newel are mahogany. Painted white balusters 3/4" x 1" are spaced approximately 5" o.c. Handrail added by the Crispells.

Heating : Five-pipe L-shaped welded hot water heating unit suspended from ceiling (20th century).

Lighting : Ceiling fixture with translucent glass globe (recent).

ROOM B8 BEDROOM


This room retains its circa-1850 character. The only intrusion is the massive heating pipe suspended from the ceiling. There is a door to the rear stair hall on the north, and there are doors on the east to a closet and to the south hall.

Floor : Carpet over painted concrete (recent).

Ceiling : Original plaster on lath.

Walls : Original plaster (north, south, and west walls have masonry substrate; east wall has lath substrate).

Doors : Three original circa-1850 doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-4).

No. B81: Original stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-10). Hardware: One pair of 3" butts and iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

No. B82: Original stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-25). Hardware: One pair of 3-1/2" butts, box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

No. B91: Original stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-9). Hardware: One pair of 3-1/2" butts, one box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

Windows : Three original windows with architraves (Type T-14 on south window and Type T-4 at west windows) at the sides and top. Window on the south wall has later 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 12", muntin size 5/8". Windows on the west wall have 3/6 sash without cords or balances. Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Heating : 4" hot water pipe suspended from ceiling near south and west walls (20th century).

ROOM B9 SOUTH HALL

The south hall, just west of the center of the south side of the building, has doors to the exterior on the south, to the bedroom on the west, and to the family room on the east.

Floor : Concrete with steel trowel finish.

Ceiling : Painted plaster on lath.

Walls : Painted plaster.

Doors : Three painted doors with architrave surrounds each slightly different from the others: East door, Type T-7; south door, Type T-9; west door, Type T-7.

No. B91: Original stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-9). Hardware: One pair of 3-1/2" butts and one box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

No. B92: Stile-and-rail door with four raised and beveled panels (Type D-23). Hardware: One pair of 4" butts, one iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs, and one iron box latch and keeper.

No. B93: Vertical tongue-and-groove beaded board (6"+_ ) with three horizontal battens (Type D-24). Hardware: One pair of 3-3/8" butts and one iron box lock and strike with brass knobs.

Heating : 4" diameter hot water pipe along south wall below ceiling (20th century). Lighting : Ceiling fixture with 7" diameter white translucent globe (recent).

ROOM B10 CLOSET

The closet, north of the south hall, opens off the bedroom.

Floor : Concrete (recent).

Ceiling : Original plaster on lath, painted.

Walls : Plaster on masonry (north and east walls) and plaster on lath (south and west walls), painted.

Doors : Original painted door with architrave surround (Type T-8).

No. B82: Stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-25). Hardware: One pair of 3-1/2" butts and one box lock and keeper with brass knobs.

Lighting : Ceiling fixture with 7" diameter white translucent globe in center of ceiling (recent).

Other Features : Shelves on north and east walls with 1" diameter pipe rod below. Shelf unit on south wall (recent).

FIRST FLOOR


Jefferson's original drawing illustrates a scheme of modest dimensions and simple plan. The long narrow entrance hall extended through the building and gave access through a still extant doorway to the garden behind the pavilion. The two large rooms flanking the hall are now used for domestic purposes and function as a living room and dining room. The largest room originally served as a lecturing room. The room adjacent to the stair on the south side of the hall was apparently part of the professor's private domain, which included all of the second floor and basement. This spacious room probably changed function depending on the needs of the occupant.

The first documented change to the first floor plan occurred about 1850 when a large two-story brick addition was added to the rear of the pavilion during the occupancy of Professor Courtnay (1842-1853). It was constructed on the site of an earlier basement story addition (c. 1832) dating from Professor Emmet's occupancy.

Paint Investigation : The initial investigation of the first floor painted surfaces in the original pavilion revealed a consistent series of colors. Woodwork, including wood cornices, door and window trim, and the baseboard crown molding, was initially primed and finished in a yellowish white paint (2.5 Y 9/2). The vertical face of the baseboards as well as the plinth blocks supporting the door and window trim were primed in yellowish white and finished in a moderate reddish brown (10 R 3/4). Original doors were primed in yellowish white and finished in three layers that form the mahogany graining.

Typically the wood mantels were primed and finished in yellowish white to match the trim. They were soon repainted in glossy black, a finish popular for wood mantels during the first half of the nineteenth century.


All the plaster walls are now covered with wallpaper and have been so treated for most of this century. It appears that all plaster wall surfaces were originally painted except the walls in the dining room, Room 103, which were covered in wallpaper. Typically, plaster walls were allowed to cure for a considerable length of time prior to the application of a finish.

Investigation of painted surfaces in the circa-1850 rear wing revealed similar paint sequences. The door and window trim were painted in a yellowish white followed by a gray brown color. The doors were grained. The simple baseboards were covered in a yellowish gray (5 Y 7/1) followed by a much deeper gray.

ROOM 101 ENTRANCE HALL



The long, narrow entrance hall oriented east to west divides the first floor of the original pavilion in half. At the east end is the entrance; at the west end a door leading to the rear hall. The living room is to the north; the dining room to the south.

The Jefferson drawing of the first floor plan lacks the two doorways at the rear of the hall which give access to the present living room and dining room. These openings are indicated in the 1822 Maverick engraving, which is probably more representative of the pavilion as completed. A variation in the door panel proportions indicates that they may be a very early pre-1822 addition.

Surviving original finishes include the flooring, baseboards, and door trim. The front and rear doors are original and retain evidence for their box locks. The glazed panels are a later nineteenth-century addition to the front door.

The non-classical molding profiles of the chair rail indicate that it is not an original feature. This notion is reinforced by the lack of paint accumulation on this element as compared to paint layering on adjoining original woodwork.

The plaster ceiling and cornice were rebuilt and lowered approximately 4" when the second floor bathrooms were installed during the middle of the twentieth century.

Floor : Original random-width (2-3/4" to 5-1/2") tongue-and-groove boards running east-west, stained and varnished.

Ceiling : Painted plaster possibly on expanded metal lath. The ceiling was lowered approximately 4" when the bathrooms were installed above (mid-20th century).

Walls : Original plaster. Above the chair rail, there is wallpaper under the outer paint layers.

Baseboard : Original 6" splashboard with molded top (Type B1).

Chair Rail : 3-3/4" wood rail (possibly late-19th century).

Cornice : 11-5/8" plaster cornice (Type C-l) projecting 12" (mid-20th century). This cornice may duplicate the original wood cornice.

Doors : Six original painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-1 and T-2).

No. 1011: Two original four-panel stile-and-rail leaves with raised and beveled wooden panels and later glass panels (Type D-l). Hardware: Each leaf has 1-1/2 pair of 5" butts. Leaves have one late nineteenth-century iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs and one Corbin iron surface-mounted box lock and keeper. South leaf has 8-1/2" x 3" brass mail slot and bottom and top iron surface bolts. Outline of original box lock is visible.

No. 1012: Original stile-and-rail rear door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-2). There is an original four-light transom above. Hardware: One pair of 4-1/2" butts and one later mortise lock and strike with brass knobs. Outline of original 6" x 10" box lock is visible.

No. 1021: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 5" butts and sheet-iron box lock and keeper, twentieth-century brass knobs.

No. 1022: Stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-4). Hardware: Original pair of 6-1/4" butts, brass mortise lock and strike plate and ornamental keyhole escutcheons. Twentieth-century brass knobs. This door may be an early pre-1822 addition.

No. 1032: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-4). Hardware: One pair of 4" butts and mortise lock and strike. Physical evidence for original box lock and oval keyhole escutcheon. This opening may be a very early addition made before 1822.

No. 1041: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 4-1/2" butts, iron box lock and keeper and oval keyhole escutcheon. Twentieth-century knobs.

Heating : One eighteen-section, three-column hot water radiator near the west end of the south wall (20th century).

Lighting : Two recent incandescent hanging ceiling fixtures of brass and beveled glass.


Paint Investigation : The investigation of the painted surface revealed the original decorative paint scheme. The wood trim, including the crown molding of the baseboards, was initially finished in a yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2). There is a total accumulation of about eleven layers of paint on the woodwork. The wood chair rail was added much later to the space. Its original color, a very dark brown, falls in the middle of the sequence of paint build-up on the other wood work.

The vertical face of the baseboards was primed in the yellowish white and finished in a moderate reddish brown ( 10 R 3/4).

The paneled doors were grained to imitate mahogany. This finish was typically used for all the doors found on the first and second floors of the original building.

The original finish of the plaster walls was discovered under a later plaster skim coat on a small area next to the front door. A brilliant yellow (2.5 Y 8.5/10) was applied to the white plaster.

The plaster ceiling and cornice are twentieth century replacements and retain no vestige of their original finishes. The trends followed in other rooms indicate that the removed wood cornice was probably painted to match the other wood trim, a yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2). The original plaster ceiling may have initially been left as unpainted white plaster.

ROOM 102 LIVING ROOM


The living room is the largest space in the pavilion and takes up the entire northern portion of the original building. It originally served as the lecturing room but at some point was incorporated into the professor's living quarters.


The room is entered by two doors from the central hall. Jefferson's original drawing shows only the east door, while the 1822 Maverick plan illustrates both entrances. The east door retains its original hinges and sheet-iron box lock secured by handmade screws. There is evidence for the original oval keyhole escutcheon on the hall side. The brass knobs are twentieth century replacements. The west hall door varies in the proportion of its six panels although all molding profiles are identical to those on the east door. The current mortise lock and keyhole escutcheons are original to the door. The brass knobs are twentieth-century replacements. The room survives remarkably intact and preserves its original wood cornice and fireplace mantel. There is physical evidence that a north-south partition was constructed at the east end of the room at some unknown date.

The two windows in the west wall of the original structure have been altered: the one on the north has been converted into a door leading to the addition; the one on the south has been filled with shelves above the sill height.

Floor : Original random-width (3-1/2" to 5-5/8") tongue-and-groove boards running north-south, stained and varnished. Original hearth is brick (7-3/4" x 3-3/4") with 1/8" joints, all now covered with a glossy black paint.

Ceiling : Painted plaster. There is ceiling paper under the outer paint layer.

Walls : Original plaster. There is wallpaper under the outer paint layers.

Baseboard : Original 6" splashboard with molded top (Type B-l ).

Cornice : Original 16" wood frieze and cornice (Type C-2).


Doors : Three painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds. The architraves of doors No. 1021 and 1022 are of Type T-2. The architrave of door No. 1051 is of Type T-3 (originally a window opening).

No. 1021: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 5" butts and sheet-iron box lock and keeper, twentieth-century brass knobs.

No. 1022: Stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-4). Hardware: Original pair of 6 1/4" butts, brass mortise lock and strike plate and ornamental keyhole escutcheons. Twentieth-century brass knobs. This door may be an early pre-1822 addition.

No. 1051: Post-1850 stile-and-rail door with four flat panels (Type D-8). Hardware: One pair of post 1850 6-1/4" butts and cast-iron box lock and keeper, twentieth-century brass knobs. This door was inserted in the frame of a window in the original structure, probably sometime after the construction of the rear addition.

Windows : Three original windows with paneled reveals at the sides and a panel at the bottom. They have architraves (Type T-3) at the sides and top. Each window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 3/4", with a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail. The lower sash of the window in the east wall is a later replacement with a different muntin profile.

Fireplace : The original 6' 8-1/4" wide chimney breast projects 2' 0-1/2'' near the center of the south wall. The brick-lined firebox is surrounded by a wood architrave molding. Above the architrave at the top of the fireplace is an original narrow (2") frieze and a 10-1/4'' cornice. Original wood corner beads are set into the two front edges of the chimney breast.

Heating : Two twenty-section, six-column hot water radiators by American Radiator along the north wall (20th century).

Other Features : The original window on the south end of the west wall was closed in (circa 1850) and filled with shelves above the sill height.

Paint Investigation : The original decorative scheme of the former lecturing room consisted of the following finishes. The wood trim, including the crown molding of the baseboards and the cornice, was initially finished in a yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2). The vertical face of the baseboards was painted in the typical moderate reddish brown (10 R 3/4). The paneled doors were grained to imitate mahogany. A yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2) was the first finish on the white plaster walls. This was followed by a pale yellow (5 Y 9/2) and later a pale green (7.5 G 6/2). The ceiling was probably initially unpainted white plaster.

ROOM 103 DINING ROOM


The original function of this ample room is unknown although it probably was considered a part of the professor's private domain. Access to the living quarters was from the door leading from the main hall into the stair hall. The use of the room probably varied from occupant to occupant, but its easy accessibility to the basement kitchen makes the dining function likely.



The room is entered by two doors from the central hall. Jefferson's drawing shows only the east door while the 1822 Maverick plan illustrates both entrances. Doorway 1032 may be an early addition made before 1822. The room survives remarkably intact. The only significant modifications were made when the circa-1850 rear addition was constructed, necessitating the modification of the two west windows.

Other changes include the insertion of a cast-iron coal grate into the fireplace (circa 1854) and the replacement of the original large box locks on doors No. 1031 and 1032 with the current mortise locks.

The room configuration includes a door leading to the stair hall, one leading to the front hall, and one leading to the pantry. The door to the pantry was inserted in the enframement of one of the windows in the original structure. The other window on the west wall was closed in, and the space was filled with shelves.

Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards (3-1/2" to 6-1/4", mostly wider) running north-south, stained and varnished. An investigation of the floor revealed a structure consisting of 12" deep floor joists spaced approximately 12-1/2" apart. A 1/2" thick layer of mud plaster is laid directly below the 1-1/8" thick floor boards and is supported on rough 3/4" thick boards attached between the joists.

Ceiling : Painted plaster. There is ceiling paper beneath outer paint layers.

Walls : Original plaster, with several layers of wall paper.

Baseboard : Original 8" high base including 6-1/2" splashboard with molded top (Type B-l).

Cornice : Original 11-1/2" high painted wood cornice (Type C-3) projecting 12".

Doors : Three painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds. The north and east doors have 6-1/2" two-fascia architraves (Type T-2). The door to the west is inserted in an original window frame with a 7-1/2" architrave (Type T-3) and paneled reveal.

No. 1031: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: One 5" butt at top and one 4" butt at bottom; later mortise lock and strike with brass knobs. Physical evidence for original box lock and oval keyhole escutcheon as existing on door No. 1021.

No. 1032: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-4). Hardware: One pair of 4" butts and mortise lock and strike. Physical evidence for original box lock and oval keyhole escutcheon. This door may be a pre-1822 addition.

No. 1033: Stile-and-rail door with six panels raised and beveled on east side of door only (Type D-6). Hardware: Twentieth-century pivot at top and bottom. There is no latch or lock. There is evidence for an original box lock and a later mortise lock. This door was installed in this location circa 1850 but dates from the original construction.

Windows : Original window in the center of the south wall with paneled reveals at the sides and a panel between the sill and floor. There is an architrave (Type T-3) at the sides and top. Window has original 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18" muntin size 3/4", with a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Fireplace : The original 6' 11" wide chimney breast projects 1' 9-1/4'' near the center of the south wall. The original mantel has an architrave surmounted by a frieze and cornice. In the center is a cast-iron grate with a brick backing and cast-iron surround (c. 1854). The area between the cast-iron and the mantel is plastered. There is an original stone hearth. Original wood corner beads are set into the two front edges of the chimney breast.

Heating : One fifteen-section, three-column hot water radiator at the west end of the south wall (20th century).

Lighting : Eight-stem electric chandelier (recent).

Paint Investigation : The dining room trim was first painted in a variation of the typical yellowish white (10 YR 9/2). The same color was used on the cornice, the mantel, and the crown molding of the baseboard.

The vertical face of the baseboard was painted in the typical moderate reddish brown (10 R 3/4). Paneled doors were grained to imitate mahogany. Preliminary investigation of the plaster walls indicates that they were originally covered with wallpaper. A more extensive removal of the existing wallpaper may reveal identifiable fragments of the older paper. The first paint color found on the plaster is a pale purple (10 PB 7/2) probably dating from the late-nineteenth century.

ROOM 104 FRONT STAIR HALL


The stair hall, in the southeast corner of the structure, follows exactly the plan as delineated by Jefferson even to the number of treads of the stairway. Today the only modifications found in the space are a cast-iron radiator and the replacement of door knobs with twentieth-century replications. Hall door No. 1041 preserves both its original sheet-iron box lock and oval keyhole escutcheon. In June 1854, the dormitory room adjoining Pavilion I to the south was assigned to Professor Bledsoe. It is possible that at that time a door opening was created in the south masonry wall of the stairway descending to the basement. An area of wall, approximately 3' 0" wide, at the top landing of the basement stair appears to be hollow behind the plaster. This connection was later covered over.

There is a door to the front hall on the north and a door to the dining room on the west. The stair to the second floor rises against the east wall across the window. The door to the basement and the stair leading down from it are on the south.

Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards (3-1/2" to 5-1/2", mostly wider) running north-south, stained and varnished.

Ceiling : Painted plaster. There is ceiling paper under the outer paint layers.

Walls : Original plaster. There is wallpaper under the outer paint layers.

Baseboard : Original 8" high base including 6" splashboard with molded top (Type B-I ) on north and west walls. Original baseboard along stair to east is 6" high including a fascia topped with a quirk and flush bead (Type B-l).

Cornice : Original l-l/2" high painted wood cornice (Type C-3) projecting 12".

Doors : Three original painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds. North and west doors have 6-3/8 " two-fascia architraves (Type T-2), south door has 5" one-fascia architrave (Type T-5).

No. 1041: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 4-1/2" butts, iron box lock and keeper and oval keyhole escutcheon. Twentieth-century knobs.

No. 1031: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: One 5" butt at top and one 4" butt at bottom; later mortise lock and strike and twentieth-century brass knobs. Physical evidence for original box lock and oval keyhole escutcheon.

No. 1042: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-5). Hardware: Original pair of 4-3/4" butts and later nineteenth-century iron box lock and keeper with twentieth-century brass knobs. Physical evidence for original box lock.

Windows : Original window with paneled reveals at the sides and a panel beneath the sill. There is an architrave (Type T-3) at the sides and top. Window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 3/4", with a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail. This sash is a later replacement.

Staircase : Original open-string stair with a straight run of eleven treads, four winders to change direction 180 degrees, and a straight run of three treads to the second floor (nineteen risers total). This arrangement agrees with Jefferson's plan. The straight treads are 9-3/4" deep with a 1" nosing and 3' 11" wide; the risers are 8" high. The string brackets are scrolls ornamented with leaves and a bud. There are two 3/4" x 1" balusters per tread. Balusters are spaced approximately 5" o.c. The treads are pine, and the railing and newel are mahogany. The first winding tread of the basement stair was enlarged by the addition of six additional boards and a new riser face.

Heating : One eleven-section, three-column hot water radiator at the north end of the west wall (20th century).

Lighting : One hanging ceiling fixture of brass and beveled glass (recent).

Paint Investigation : The stair hall seems to follow the precedent set by the finishes in the main hall (Room 101). A yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2) was first used on the wood trim including the cornice, baseboard crown molding, and the stair balusters. The stair risers and the handrail were finished in a varnish. The vertical face of the baseboard was painted in a moderate reddish brown (10 R 3/4). The three original doors were grained to imitate mahogany. Like the front hall, the walls were finished in a brilliant yellow (2.5 Y 8.5/10) to which a protective varnish or glaze was applied. This protective coating would allow the delicate tint to better withstand traffic on the stairway.

ROOM 105 BEDROOM


This bedroom is located in the circa-1850 addition to the original building. It has doors leading to the living room on the east, the rear hall on the south, and the dressing room to the west. There are two windows in the north wall flanking a projecting chimney breast.

The detailing of the door, trim and lock of the doorway in the east wall indicates that this feature was added to the 1850 space sometime later in the nineteenth century. The cut lines in the baseboard along the chimney breast on the north wall may indicate the location of an ornamental wood mantel. There is no evidence for a hearth in the flooring. A cast-iron heating stove was probably situated in this position.

Floor : Original random-width (4" to 5-1/2") tongue and-groove boards running east-west, stained and varnished.

Ceiling : Original painted plaster. There is ceiling paper under the outer paint layers.

Walls : Original plaster. There is wallpaper under the outer paint layers.

Baseboard : Original 5-1/2" high with splashboard topped by a flush bead (Type B-2). Two cut lines on face of chimney breast indicate the probable location for an ornamental wood mantel.

Doors : Three painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-4).

No. 1051: Post-1850 stile-and-rail door with four flat panels (Type D-8). Hardware: Original post-1850 pair of 4" butts and one iron box lock and keeper. Twentieth-century brass knobs. This door was inserted in the frame of a window in the original structure but does not date from the initial construction of the wing (circa 1850).

No. 1061: Original stile-and-rail door with four flat panels (Type D-9). Hardware: Original pair of 3-1/4" butts and later iron box lock and keeper. Twentieth-century brass knobs. Physical evidence indicates that the original lock matched that still on door No. 1052.

No. 1052: Original stile-and-rail door with four panels (Type D-7). Hardware: Original pair of 3" butts original iron box lock, marked "J. Carpenters Patent," and keeper. Twentieth-century brass knobs.

Windows : Two original windows with architraves (Type T-4) at the sides and top. Each window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 5/8". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Heating : One eight-section, thee-column hot water radiator in southwest corner (20th century).

Other Features : Original plastered chimney breast centered on the north wall.

Paint Investigation : There is some variation in the decorative schemes revealed in the circa-1850 addition. The trim was originally finished in a yellowish white (2 5 Y 9/2) A yellowish gray (5 Y 7/1) was applied to the simple baseboard. The paneled doors were grained to imitate mahogany The early sequence found on the plaster walls included a pinkish white (5 R 9/1), a bluish white (10 B 9/1), and a third layer consisting of wallpaper.

ROOM 106 DRESSING ROOM

The dressing room is in the northwest corner of the circa-1850 addition. It has an original door to the bedroom on the east and a later nineteenth-century doorway to the bathroom on the south. The south partition is a later insertion into the original larger room which encompassed Rooms 106 and 107. There is one window in the north end of the west wall. A late-nineteenth- or early-twentieth-century built-in wardrobe occupies the southeast corner of the room.

Floor : Original random-width (4" to 5-1/4") tongue-and-groove boards running east-west, stained and varnished. A repair in front of door No. 1071 may be the location of a nineteenth-century hot air heating duct.

Ceiling : Original plaster. Ceiling paper under outer paint coats.

Walls : Original plaster. Wallpaper under outer paint coats.

Baseboard : Original 6-1/4" high (Type B-2).

Doors : Two painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-4 east opening and Type T-5 south opening).

No. 1061 Original stile-and-rail door with four flat panels (Type D-9). Hardware: Original pair of 3-1/4" butts and later iron b lo~ and keeper with twentieth-century brass knobs. Physical evidence for the original ''Carpenters Patent" box lock.

No. 1071: Later stile-and-rail door with four flat panels (Type D-25). Original pair of 4-1/2" butts and later mortise lock and strike with twentieth-century brass knob on north and chrome knob on south. Physical evidence for original small box lock.

Windows : One original window with architrave (Type T-4) at the sides and top. 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12' x 18', muntin size 3/4". Sash with sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Heating : One sixteen-section, three-column hot water radiator at the west end of the north wall (20th century ).

Other Feature : The built-in wardrobe in the southeast corner is approximately 5' 6" long and 2' 0" deep. It has three doors (the two on the east end are paired), each with two panels. It has a 9" baseboard and a 3-1/2" cymatium (late-19th or early-20th century ).

Paint Investigation : This small room, originally incorporating what is now the bathroom (Room 107), was finished in the same scheme found in the larger room to the east (Room 105). The much later built-in cabinet was first painted a light yellowish green (10 GY 8/4), a color also used on the wood door and window trim at the same time.

ROOM 107 BATHROOM

The bathroom is on the west end of the circa-1850 addition with doors opening to the back hall on the south and to the dressing room on the north. There is a window to the west

Rooms 106 and 107 may originally have been a single space with sole access from the bedroom, Room 105.

Floor Recent 9" x 9" resilient tile. The floor is raised 1-1/2" above adjacent floors. Two other flooring finishes exist beneath.

Ceiling : Original plaster, painted.

Walls :Original plaster, painted. 4-1/4" x 4-1/4" glazed wall tile around bathtub. The north wall may be a later addition.

Baseboard : Original 5-1/2" high with quirk and flush bead at top (Type B-2), later quarterround at bottom.

Doors : Two painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-6).

No. 1071: Post-1850 stile-and-rail door with four panels (Type D-25). One pair of 4-1/2" butts and one mortise lock and strike with twentieth-century brass knob on north and chrome knob on south. Physical evidence for original small box lock.

No. 1072: Post-1850 stile-and-rail door with four panels (Type D-11). One pair of 4-1/2" butts and one mortise lock and strike with twentieth-century brass knob on south and chrome knob on north. Physical evidence for original small box lock.

Windows : One original window with architrave (Type T-4) at the sides and top on west wall. Window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 5/8". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Heating : One eight-section, four-column hot water radiator in front of the window on the west wall (20th century).

Lighting : Hanging ceiling fixture with ribbed glass globe approximately 7" in diameter. Fixture with horizontal glass lens over mirror on north wall (20th century).

Plumbing : 5' cast-iron bathtub with white enamel finish. White porcelain water closet. White pedestal sink with oval bowl on columnar shaft with flared base; chrome faucets (20th century).

Other Features : Semi-recessed medicine cabinet; 2' towel bar; toilet paper holder (recent).

Paint Investigation : The initial investigation of this bathroom did not reveal any early finishes. Both the wood trim and the plaster walls reveal white as their earliest finishes which date from the twentieth-century remodeling. The original finishes of the larger room including both Rooms 106 and 107 seem to duplicate those found in Room 105.

ROOM 108 REAR HALL

The rear hall, in the center of the western end of the circa-1850 addition, has an original door leading to the center hall on the east and to the kitchen on the south. A later door opens into the bathroom on the north. A large two-leaf casement window overlooks the garden to the west. This window originally opened onto the roof of a small rear addition visible in the 1856 lithograph.

Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards (2-1/2" to 5", mainly 4' to 5") running east-west, stained and varnished.

Ceiling : Original plaster, painted.

Walls : Original plaster. There is wallpaper under outer paint layers.

Baseboard : Original 5-1/2" high with a quirk and flush bead at the top (Type B-2). Later quarterround at bottom.

Doors : Three painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (east and south openings, Type T-4; north opening, Type T-6).

No. 1081: Stile-and-rail door with four raised and beveled panels (Type D-12). Hardware: One pair of 3-1/2" butts and iron box lock and keeper with twentieth-century brass knobs. Although the opening is original, the door may be a later insertion.

No. 1072: Stile-and-rail door with four panels (Type D-11). Hardware: One pair of 4-1/2" butts and one mortise lock and strike with twentieth-century brass knob on south and chrome knob on north. This door and opening may have been added sometime after 1850.

No. 1082: Original stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-9). Hardware: Original pair of 3" butts and iron box lock and keeper with twentieth-century brass knobs.

Windows : One two-sash inswinging casement window with architrave at sides and top (Type T-4). Each sash has eight panes. Pane size 8" x 17-1/4", muntin size 5/8". Each sash has one pair of 2-1/2" butts. North sash has surface-mounted bolt at top; south sash has surface-mounted bolt at bottom. The opening is original although the casement sash are a later addition. These "doors" opened onto the balustraded roof of a small rear addition.

Lighting : 7" diameter ceiling-mounted glass globe in the center of the room.

Paint Investigation : Original finishes found in the back hall include a yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2) on the wood trim and a yellowish gray (5 Y 7/1) on the baseboard. Some of the wood trim shows evidence of a fire in the form of a charred wood surface. The plaster walls may have been finished in a moderate orange yellow (7.5 YR 7/6).

ROOM 109 KITCHEN


The kitchen is in the southwest corner of the house. It has a door to the rear hall on the north and a door to the pantry on the east. There are two windows on the west wall and one window on the south wall. It appears that the kitchen (Room 109) and adjoining pantry (Room 110) have undergone several transformations. During the Crispells' occupancy (1965-1987) a north-south partition was removed from the west end of the kitchen. The long narrow room west of this partition was used as a painting studio by the wife of Dr. Speidel. The Speidels occupied the pavilion from 1946 to 1964. Although the east kitchen partition existed when they moved in, its construction dates from the twentieth century.

As first built (circa 1850) a large square room that incorporated the east half of Room 109 and all of Room 110 may have existed in this location with a narrow room to the west.

Floor : Resilient sheet flooring imitating brick laid in basket-weave pattern (recent).

Ceiling : Painted plaster. Metal-lined stove pipe opening.

Walls : Painted plaster. A north-south partition was removed by the Crispells. The east partition is composed of wood studs with plaster on expanded metal lath.

Baseboard : Original 5-1/2" high base with quirk and flush bead at top (Type B-2). Later quarterround at bottom.

Doors : Two painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (north opening, Type T-4; east opening, Type T-6).

No. 1082: Original stile-and-rail door with four flat, recessed panels (Type D-9). Hardware: Original pair of 3" butts and iron box lock and keeper with twentieth-century brass knobs.

No. 1091: Post-1850 stile-and-rail door with four flat panels (Type D-13). Hardware: Original pair of 4-1/2" butts and mortise lock and strike with brass knobs. The door and trim are older than the partition.

Windows : Three original floor-level windows with architraves (Type T-4) at the sides and top. Each window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 5/8". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Heating : One nine-section, three-column hot water radiator at east end of south wall (20th century).

Lighting : One 8' lighting track running east-west in center of room with four track-mounted cans (late 20th century).

Plumbing : Two-compartment stainless steel sink with faucets and spray (recent).

Equipment : Dishwasher, stainless steel wall oven, 30" electric range in stainless steel, and stainless steel range hood (recent).

Other Features : Base and wall cabinets. Fire extinguisher behind radiator (recent). Original plastered chimney breast in the southeast corner.

Paint Investigation : The extensive remodeling of the kitchen area made it difficult to discover traces of original finishes. There was some indication that the wood trim in this area may have been grained.

ROOM 110 PANTRY

The Crispells modified the pantry when they removed a large two-tiered built-in storage cabinet that existed against the west wall. This wood cabinet is now separated into two sections and is located in basement Room B5. It appears to date from the first half of the twentieth century. Preliminary evidence indicates that this narrow space was originally joined with the east half of the present kitchen, Room 109, to form a large square room with a chimney breast centered on the south wall.

The pantry has a door to the stair hall on the north, a door to the kitchen on the west, and a door to the dining room on the east. There is a window on the south wall.

Floor : Resilient sheet flooring imitating brick laid in basket-weave pattern (recent).

Ceiling : Painted plaster.

Walls : Painted plaster.

Baseboard : Original 5-1/2" high base with quirk and flush bead at top and recent quarterround at bottom (Type B-2).

Doors : Three painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds. The door to the west has a one-fascia architrave (Type T-6); the earlier doors to the north and east have two-fascia architraves (Type T-4).

No. 1011: Original circa-1850 stile-and-rail door with four panels (Type D-17). Hardware: Original pair of 3" butts and original iron box lock, marked "J. Carpenters Patent," and keeper. Twentieth-century brass knobs.

No. 1091: Later stile-and-rail door with four flat panels (Type D-13). Hardware: One pair of 4-1/2" butts and mortise lock and strike which replaced the original small box lock located on the opposite stile. Twentieth-century brass knobs.

No. 1033: Early stile-and-rail door with six panels raised and beveled on east side of door only (Type D-6). Hardware: Twentieth-century pivot at top and bottom. There is no latch or lock. Physical evidence for original box lock and later mortise lock. The configuration of this door dates it to the original construction or soon after, although its earlier position is unknown.

Windows : Original window at floor level with architrave (Type T-4) at the sides and top. Window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 5/8". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Lighting : One 3' lighting track centered east-west and about 4' from south wall with two track-mounted cans (late-20th century).

Plumbing : One single-compartment stainless steel sink with faucets and spray (late-20th century).

Other Features : Base and wall cabinets, painted and grained (late-20th century). These are in the position of the earlier cabinets now located in basement Room B5.

Paint Investigation : The only original finishes uncovered in this room were traces of graining on the woodwork and on the paneled doors. The whites found on other surfaces are of recent origin.

ROOM 111 REAR STAIR HALL


The back stair hall retains its original circa-1850 appearance. The only significant modification was made by the Crispells (1965-1987) when they removed the wall and door that enclosed the stairway at basement level. At that time they added that portion of the handrail that descends into the basement.

There are doors to the front hall on the east, to the rear hall on the west, to the bedroom on the north, and to the pantry on the south.

Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards running east-west except for three boards on the east end that run north-south, stained and varnished.

Ceiling : Original plaster. There is ceiling paper under the outer layers of paint.

Walls : Original plaster. There is wallpaper under the outer layers of paint.

Baseboard : Original 5-1/2" high base with a quirk and flush bead at the top and later quarterround at bottom (Type B-2).

Doors : Four painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (east opening, Type T-11; north, south, and west openings, Type T-4).

No. 1012: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-2). There is an original four-light transom above. Hardware: Original pair of 4-1/2" butts and later mortise lock and strike. Twentieth-century brass knobs. Physical evidence for original box lock. This is the original rear entrance to the Jefferson pavilion.

No. 1052: Original stile-and-rail door with four panels (Type D- 7). Hardware: Original pair of 3" butts and "Carpenters Patent" iron box lock and keeper. Twentieth-century brass knobs. No. 1081: Stile-and-rail door with four raised and beveled panels (Type D-12). Hardware: One pair of 3-1/2" butts and small iron box lock. Although the opening is original, the door may be a replacement.

No. 1101: Original stile-and-rail door with four panels (Type D-17). Hardware: Original pair of 3" butts and "Carpenters Patent" iron box lock and keeper. Twentieth-century brass knobs.

Stairway : Original stairway is 2' 9" wide and has fifteen risers down to basement. Balustrade along north of stairs has a mahogany railing and newel with 3/4" x 1-1/4" balusters approximately 4-1/8" on center. The lower handrail was added by the Crispells when they removed the enclosing partition.

Heating : One seventeen-section, four-column hot water radiator by American Radiator at the west end of the north wall (20th century).

Lighting : One ceiling fixture with a 7" diameter frosted glass globe in the center north-south near the east end (recent).

Other Features : Skylight near west end is doubleglazed with wire glass above plastic. This may be an original circa-1850 feature although the frame and glazing are later.

Paint Investigation : The stair hall survives in its original circa-1850 form. Original finishes include trim painted in a yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2) and baseboards painted a yellowish gray (5 Y 7/1). The paneled doors and the stair balusters were grained. The plaster walls were initially finished in a yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2) followed by a moderate orange yellow (7.5 YR 7/6).

SECOND FLOOR


The second floor plan as originally completed followed the Jefferson plan. The only discrepancy is in the configuration of the fireplaces. The plan consisted of a wide central hall extending from the front to the rear of the pavilion. North of the hall were two equally sized rooms, probably chambers. South of the hall was a large formal room probably serving as the parlor. A small stair hall was located in the southeast corner. The first documented change to this plan was the addition of a stairway to the garret story in 1832 during the occupancy of Professor Emmet. Prior to this change the access to the space above the second floor was through a large hatchway in the ceiling of the central hall. This feature survives today above the lowered ceilings of the bathrooms. It should be noted that the configuration of the hatch door follows that of the original room doors in the basement including the handwrought hinges.

There is evidence on the walls and cornice of the original hall of an inserted partition located at the south edge of the opening into the attic. This thin partition formed a small room at the south end of the central hall. Prior to the removal of this partition, the walls and cornice were finished in a beige gloss enamel paint, which may indicate that the space functioned as a bathroom. The front portion of the hall was wallpapered at this time.

A major twentieth-century modification involved the construction of two bathrooms within the space of the central hall. The ceiling was lowered, and the later partition wall located at the rear end of the hall was removed.


Paint Investigation : Investigation of second floor painted surfaces revealed schemes similar to those of the first floor. The yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2) paint used on the first floor wood trim was found in the stair hall and the original central hall.

Baseboards were typically covered in reddish brown ( 10 R 3/4) while doors were grained to imitate mahogany. The 1886 roof fire probably caused considerable water damage to the plaster walls and ceilings of the second floor. The paint investigation revealed evidence of this traumatic event. In certain areas it was difficult or impossible to be certain of the correct sequence of the decorative treatment.

ROOM 201 STAIR HALL


The stair hall, in the southeast corner of the second floor, retains its original appearance. In 1832 the stairway was continued to the attic or garret in a manner that complimented the original stairway. The only intrusion in the space is the large recent wardrobe in the northeast corner. There is a door into the front hall on the north and one into the master bedroom on the west. Stairs along the west wall go down to the first floor; stairs along the east wall go up to the attic.

Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards (3-1/8" to 5-3/8") running north-south, stained and varnished.

Ceiling : Original plaster on split wood lath. There is ceiling paper under the outer paint layers.

Walls : Original plaster. There is wallpaper under the outer paint layers.

Baseboard : Original 8" high wood base including 6-1/4" splashboard with molded top (Type B-1). Twentieth-century quarterround at bottom.

Cornice : Original 2' 3" high entablature with two-fascia architrave, frieze, and cornice (Type C-4). A portion of the cornice along the west wall was removed when the attic stairway was constructed in 1832.

Doors : Two painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-2).

No. 2011: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 5" butts and iron box lock and keeper, brass knobs, and oval keyhole escutcheon. This door and four others on this floor retain all of their original hardware.

No. 2081: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 4-1/2" butts and later mortise lock and strike. Twentieth-century brass knobs. Physical evidence for earlier original mortise lock.

Windows : Original window on the east wall with paneled reveals at the sides and architrave (Type T-2) at the sides and top. Window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 3/4". The upper and lower sash are later replacements with a different muntin profile. Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Lighting : Brass and glass incandescent lantern (late 20th century).

Staircase : Open-string stair to attic with a straight run of seven treads along the east wall, four winders to change direction 180 degrees, and three treads to the attic level. The straight treads are 10" wide with a 1" nosing; the risers are 8-3/8" high. The simple string brackets have double-"S"-scrolled bottom edges. There are two 3/4" x 1" balusters per tread. Balusters are spaced approximately 5" o.c. There is a molded rail and newel (constructed in 1832).

Other Features : There is a built-in wardrobe (5' x 2' x 7' 8" high) with two flush sliding doors at the north end of the east wall. The baseboard continues around the wardrobe, which is capped with a simple cymatium (recent).

Paint Investigation : Investigation of this stair hall revealed that the wood trim, including the wood cornice, was originally painted in the same yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2) found on the first floor trim. The vertical face of the baseboard was first finished in a moderate reddish brown ( 10 R 3/4). The doors were grained to imitate mahogany. A determination of the original finish on the wall plaster was not definite. Some samples showed evidence of a yellowish white on the white plaster. Further sampling is needed to determine if the brilliant yellow, used in the first floor stair hall, was used in this space. The second paint layer found on the cornice was a very pale purple (10 PB 8/2). After the addition of the 1832 stairway leading to the attic, all of the woodwork was painted in a pale beige. The stair balusters and handrail were finished in a glossy varnish.

ROOM 202 FRONT HALL

This space along with the two bathrooms and small rear hall originally formed a long central hall. Although constructed in the twentieth century, the exact date of these spaces is unknown. Remarkably the walls, cornice, and ceiling of the original hall survive completely intact above the lowered ceiling of these small rooms. Remnants of an early knob-and-tube electrical system also survive in the space above the lowered ceiling. The front hall, in the center of the east end of the structure, has a pair of doors to the porch on the east, a bedroom on the north, a bathroom on the west, and the stair hall on the south.

Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards (2-1/2" to 6-3/4") running east-west, stained and varnished.

Ceiling : Painted plaster on expanded metal lath (20th century). Original plaster on wood lath ceiling survives above this ceiling.

Walls : Original plaster. There is wallpaper under the top paint layers.

Baseboard : Original 8" high with a 6-1/4" splashboard with molded top (Type B-l).

Cornice : 2-3/4" x 2-3/4" plaster cavetto (20th century). Original hall cornice (Type C-4) still exists above the lowered ceiling.

Doors : Four painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds. Doors to north, east, and south have architrave Type T-2; door to west has Type T-4.

No. 2021: Original two stile-and-rail leaves each with two raised and beveled panels and a glass panel (Type D-14). Hardware: Two pair of original 5" butts, iron box lock and keeper, brass knobs, and iron surface bolt at floor. Brass sliding bolt (recent).

No. 2041: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of butts and iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs and oval keyhole escutcheon.

No. 2031: Stile-and-rail door with three raised and beveled panels (Type D-15). Hardware: One pair of butts and mortise lock and strike (20th century).

No. 2011: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 5" butts and iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs and oval keyhole escutcheon.

Lighting : Incandescent fixture with 7" diameter white frosted glass globe in center of the ceiling (recent).

Paint Investigation : This small room is the front portion of the original long central hall. The wood trim including the original cornice, located above the lowered ceiling, was first painted in the yellowish white (2.5 Y 9/2) used on the first floor. The vertical face of the baseboard was finished in a moderate reddish brown (10 R 3/4), and the original doors were grained to imitate mahogany. Two layers of twentieth-century wallpaper now cover the white plaster walls. These were first painted with two layers of white followed by the brilliant yellow (2.5 Y 8.5/8) used in the first floor hall. This color in turn was covered in a moderate orange yellow (7.5 YR 7/8).

ROOM 203 BATHROOM

The bathroom opens off the west side of the front hall and was created in the twentieth century within the space of the original east-west hall.

Floor : 9" x 9" resilient tile (recent).

Ceiling : Painted plaster with a tongue-and-groove board hatch to the crawl space above (20th century).

Walls : Painted plaster. The wall around the bathtub is covered with 4-1/4" x 4-1/4" glazed ceramic tile (20th century).

Baseboard : 5-1/4" high wood base with quarterround at the bottom and quirk and flush bead at the top (20th century).

Doors : One painted and grained door with architrave surround (Type T-8).

No. 2031: Twentieth-century stile-and-rail door with three raised and beveled panels (Type D-15). Hardware: Original pair of butts and mortise lock and strike. Robe hook on rear of door.

Lighting : Fixture with ribbed, spherical globe suspended in center of ceiling and fixture with horizontal glass lens over medicine cabinet (recent).

Plumbing : White enamelled, cast-iron, wallmounted lavatory. White porcelain, floor-mounted water closet. White enamelled, cast-iron bathtub (20th century).

Other Features : Medicine cabinet, 2' towel bar, toilet paper holder (20th century).

ROOM 204 BEDROOM


This bedroom or chamber, in the northeast corner of the second floor, survives with all of its original finishes. The only modifications were made in the mid-nineteenth century when the cast-iron coal grate insert was added to the fireplace and a Victorian box lock was substituted for the original lock on the door leading to bedroom 205. There is a door to the front hall on the south and a door to the bedroom behind on the west. There are windows on the north and east walls.

Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards (4-1/8" to 5-3/4") running north-south, stained and varnished. Stone hearth on floor in southwest corner was probably added with the coal grate (c. 1854).

Ceiling : Original painted plaster on split lath, wallpaper painted over.

Walls : Original plaster with recent wallpaper.

Baseboard : Original 8-1/8" high with 6-1/4" splashboard with molded top (Type B-l).

Cornice : Original 2' 3" high entablature with two-fascia architrave, frieze, and cornice (Type C-4).

Doors : Two original painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-2).

No. 2041: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of butts, iron box lock and keeper, brass knobs, and oval keyhole escutcheon on hall side.

No. 2042: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of butts and later cast-iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs ("Patented July 21, 1865"). Physical evidence for the original large box lock.

Windows : Two original windows beginning at floor level with reveals and architraves (Type T-2) at the sides and top. Each window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 3/4". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail. The upper and lower sash of the east window are later replacements.

Fireplace : The original chimney in the southwest corner now has a circa-1854 cast-iron fender with a brick back. The iron coal grate is missing. The cast-iron frame is surrounded by plaster which is, in turn, framed by a wooden architrave. A cast-iron Franklin fireplace similar to the one still extant in Pavilion VII originally was fitted to this chimney.

Heating : One eighteen-section, three-column hot water radiator along the east wall (20th century).

Paint Investigation : The wood trim, including the cornice and the mantel architrave, was first painted a yellowish white (10 YR 9/2). The vertical face of the baseboard was covered in the moderate reddish brown (10 R 3/4). Approximately five layers of paint exist beneath the current wallpaper. The earliest layer is a white followed by a pale yellow (2.5 Y 9/4) and a light orange yellow (10 YR 8/8). There is also a trace of a terra-cotta red. The mahogany graining is the earliest finish found on the doors.

ROOM 205 BEDROOM


Like the adjoining room, this space, in the northwest corner of the second floor, may have always functioned as a bedroom or chamber. The only significant changes are the installation of the coal grate (c. 1854) and the Victorian lock which replaces the original large box lock on the door leading into Room 204. This room has a door to the front bedroom on the east, a door to the rear hall on the south, and two windows each on the north and west walls.


Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards (4" to 6") running north-south, stained and varnished. Stone hearth in southeast corner (c. 1854).

Ceiling : Original plaster on split wood lath, painted.

Walls : Original plaster now with wallpaper.

Baseboard : Original 8-1/8" high wood base with 6-1/4" splashboard with molded top (Type B-l).

Cornice : Original 2' 3" high entablature with two-fascia architrave, frieze, and cornice (Type C-4).

Doors : Two original painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-2).

No. 2042: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of butts and later iron box lock and keeper ("Patented July 21, 1865") with brass knobs.

No. 2051: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original 5" butt at top and 3-1/4" butt at bottom (replacing larger butt). Original iron box lock and keeper with brass knobs and oval keyhole escutcheon.

Windows : Four original windows beginning at floor level with architraves (Type T-2) at the sides and top. Each window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 3/4". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Fireplace : The original chimney in the southeast corner has a cast-iron coal grate and fender with a brick back. The cast-iron frame is surrounded by plaster which is, in turn, framed by a wooden architrave. A cast-iron Franklin fireplace similar to the one still extant in Pavilion VII originally was fitted to this chimney.

Heating : Three hot water radiators: One ten-section, three-column radiator between the windows on the west wall; one five-section, three-column radiator at the north end of the west wall; one fivesection, three-column radiator at the west end of the north wall (early 20th century).

Paint Investigation : A pale yellow (5 Y 9/2) is the earliest finish found on the wood trim, including the cornice and mantel architrave. A moderate reddish brown ( 10 R 3/4) was found on the vertical face of the baseboard. The walls were finished in the same sequence as discovered in the neighboring chamber (204). Also found were a moderate yellow green (7.5 Y 7/6-6/6) and a brownish orange (2.5 YR 5/10).

ROOM 206 REAR HALL

This small hall was originally the rear portion of the long central hall that extended from the front to the back of the second floor. At some point during the first half of this century the two bathrooms were constructed within the hall thereby creating this small room. The rear hall has doors to a bedroom on the north, the master bedroom on the south, and the bathroom on the east. There is a window on the west.

Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards (4-1/2" to 6") running east-west, stained and varnished.

Ceiling : Painted plaster on expanded metal lath (20th century).

Walls : Original painted plaster.

Baseboard : Original 8-1/8" high wood base with 6-1/4" splashboard with molded top (Type B-l). The plinth blocks, higher than others in the additions, are relatively recent.

Doors : Three original painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds. The door on the east wall has a simpler architrave (Type T-4) than the doors on the north and south walls (Type T-2).

No. 2051: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original 5" butt at top and 3-1/4" butt at bottom (replacing larger butt). Original iron box lock and keeper, brass knobs, and oval escutcheon.

No. 2071: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-16). Hardware: One pair of 4-3/4" butts and one mortise lock and strike with chrome knobs (20th century). Physical evidence for original hardware on the opposite stile. This door is of the same period and style as other original doors in the pavilion but was placed in this location in the twentieth century.

No. 2082: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 5" butts and one mortise lock and strike.

Windows : One original window starting at floor level with an architrave (Type T-2) at sides and top. Window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 3/4". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail.

Lighting : Ceiling fixture with a 7" diameter translucent white globe in center of the ceiling (recent).

Paint Investigation : The earliest finishes are the same as those uncovered in the small front hall (Room 202).

ROOM 207 BATHROOM

This room was created during the first half of the twentieth century from part of the long central hall.

Floor : 9" x 9" resilient tile (recent).

Ceiling : Painted plaster on expanded metal lath (20th century).

Walls : Painted plaster. Glazed wall tile 4-1/4" x 4-1/4" around bathtub. The north and south walls may have original plaster.

Baseboard : 5-1/2" high with a quarterround at the base and a splashboard ending with a quirk and a flush bead (Type B-2) (20th century).

Doors : One painted and grained door with architrave surround (Type T-6).

No. 2071: Stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-16). Hardware: One pair of 4-3/4" butts and one mortise lock and strike with chrome knobs (20th century). Three hat-and-coat hooks on rear of door. This is an original pavilion door reused in this location in the twentieth century.

Heating : One three-section, three-column hot water radiator in the southwest corner (20th century).

Lighting : Suspended fixture with 7" diameter ribbed translucent lens in center of ceiling. Fixture with horizontal lens over medicine cabinet (recent).

Plumbing : White enamelled cast-iron lavatory with faucets; white porcelain floor-mounted two-piece water closet; white enamelled cast-iron bathtub with faucets, fill spout, and shower head (20th century).

Other Features : Medicine cabinet, towel bar, toilet paper holder (20th century).

ROOM 208 MASTER BEDROOM


This large and elegant room with its decorative entablature originally served as the professor's parlor. The use changed when the first floor lecture room was included in the professor's domain. The addition of the circa-1854 coal grate is the only significant remaining modification made in the room. There is physical evidence for a former north-south partition that extended from the west side of the south window architrave to the west side of the chimney breast. The large plywood wardrobe recently installed in the room significantly diminishes the fine character of the space. The master bedroom occupies most of the south side of the second floor behind the stair hall on the east. One door in the center of the east wall leads to the stair hall and another at the west end of the north wall leads to the rear hall. The chimney breast, supporting a mantel, projects from the north wall.

Floor : Original random-width tongue-and-groove boards (4-1/2" to 6-1/4") running north-south, stained and varnished. There is a 2' 4" deep by 3' 11" wide stone hearth set on the flooring in front of the mantel.

Ceiling : Plaster on expanded metal lath. The original wood lath survives above.

Walls : Original plaster with recent "silk" wallpaper.

Baseboard : Original 7-3/4" high wood base including a 6" splashboard with molded top (Type B-l).

Cornice : Original 1' 11-3/4" high wood entablature with a three-fascia architrave, frieze (ornamented with bucrania and putti connected by garlands), and denticulated cornice (Type C-5). The ornaments are formed of a molded composition material except for the beads suspended from the bucrania. These beads are of cast-lead. A portion of the frieze in the southwest corner, consisting of six swags, three putt), and three bucrania, appears to be a later repair.

Doors : Two original painted and grained doors with architrave surrounds (Type T-2).

No. 2081: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 4-1/2" butts and later mortise lock and strike and twentieth-century brass knobs. Physical evidence for original knob and keyhole location. This door always had a mortise lock.

No. 2082: Original stile-and-rail door with six raised and beveled panels (Type D-3). Hardware: Original pair of 5" butts and mortise lock and strike.

Windows : Three original windows beginning at floor level with reveals and architraves (Type T-2) at the sides and top. Each window has 6/6 double rope-hung sash, pane size 12" x 18", muntin size 3/4". Sash have a sweep thumb latch on the meeting rail. The west window sash are original, but the south sash are replacements.

Fireplace : The 6' 11" wide chimney breast projects 1' 8-1/4" near the middle of the north wall. The original wood corner beads have been replaced with twentieth-century metal beads. The original wood mantel has a two-fascia architrave with a plain frieze and denticulated cornice. Within the mantel is a plaster surface surrounding a circa-1854 cast-iron firebox frame and iron coal grate and fender. A cast-iron Franklin fireplace similar to the one still located in Pavilion VII may have been used here.

Heating : One twelve-section, three-column hot water radiator near the west end of the south wall (20th century).

Other Features : There is a 2' 4-1/4" deep by 4' 0" wide built-in wardrobe with two sliding flush doors at the north end of the east wall. The baseboard continues around the wardrobe, which is capped with a simple cymatium (recent).

Paint Investigation : This is the largest and most formal room on the second floor. It originally functioned as the professor's parlor. The wood trim, including the decorated cornice, was initially painted in a yellowish white ( 10 YR 9/2) followed by a greenish white (5 G 9/1). The wood mantel was first covered in the yellowish white but was later repainted in a glossy black. The vertical face of the baseboard was covered in a moderate reddish brown (10 R 3/4). The first color found on the white plaster walls was a pale orange yellow ( 10 YR 9/4).

ATTIC

The stair that now provides access to the attic was constructed in 1832. Prior to that time the only entrance to the attic was through the still extant large hatchway located beneath the two brick chimney masses. This hatch now gives access to the space above the lowered ceiling of the second floor hall.


There is evidence of extensive fire damage on the framing members particularly along the south end of the space. A chimney fire is recorded during the occupancy of Dr. Emmet. A more serious fire, which broke out in 1886, is probably responsible for the exterior damage to the roof structure still visible. Remarkably, the lower floors of the building were not involved in the fire although there must have been some water damage.


The large unused space located at the front end of the pavilion between the attic floor and the ceiling of the front portico is accessible behind the knee walls at the east end of the attic.

Floor : Original tongue-and-groove boards running east-west. Post-1886 replacement boards on east side of room are 4" wide. Boards on west side of room are random width (3-3/4" to 6-1/2"). There is an original 3' 0" x 6' 8" hatch in the floor made of tongue-and groove boards with 2 battens and opening on H-L hinges (Type D-27).

Ceiling : Roof rafters support AD INT grade plywood sheathing (1985). Numerous rafters and collars were replaced after the 1886 fire.

Walls : The east and west walls have studs (2-3/4" x 3-3/4" on the east wall and 2-1/2" x 6-1/2" on the west) supporting tongue-and-groove board sheathing on the exterior; there is no surface on the interior. The low north and south walls have studs with horizontal tongue-and-groove sheathing. Some of this sheathing is charred and predates the 1886 fire.

Doors : One door.

No. A1: Door with 4" tongue-and-groove boards with 3 horizontal battens (Type D-26). Hardware: Original pair of 3-1/4" butts, iron box lock and keeper with enamel knobs and steel hasp (post-1886).

Windows : Two semi-circular windows (6' 6" in diameter), one at the east and one at the west, with inswinging nineteen-pane sash hinged at bottom. There is no trim on the frame. Panes are formed by semicircular muntins and by radiating muntins. The window in the east wall has two 3-1/2" butt hinges, one twist lock, and two chains to restrain it from falling inward. The window in the west wall has three 3" butts, one wood twist lock, and one heavy chain in center. These sash are recent copies of the originals.

Chimney : The two original chimneys from below corbel towards each other to meet 7' 10 " above the floor level and pass through the roof as one chimney.

Stairway Enclosure : The 1832 stairway to the second floor is enclosed with walls of vertical tongue-and groove boards (post-1886).

Lighting : One porcelain socket with bulb on octagon box (mid-20th century). Remnants of the early knob-and-tube electrical system.


GARDEN


As is the case with the other West Lawn pavilion gardens, the garden of Pavilion I in its present form dates from 1952 when it was laid out and planted to the design of landscape architect Alden Hopkins from Colonial Williamsburg for The Garden Club of Virginia. The garden is divided into two sections separated by a serpentine brick wall. The upper section, nearest Pavilion I, was based on elements found at Hampton House, near Baltimore. The lower section, behind Hotel A, was laid out as a utilitarian kitchen garden. Like the other gardens of the West Lawn, it is comparatively flat without serious topographical problems.

The precedents for the residential section were mentioned in the pamphlet that accompanied the opening ceremonies for the gardens on April 24, 1952: Note: 1

The detailed pavilion garden design has been adapted from descriptions of the early 19th century garden by M'Mahon and from the excellent existing example on the great terrace at "Hampton." At that important place near Baltimore, the Ridgely family had completed by 1811, the meandering white graveled walk to enclose their great Lawn. The small lawn of this garden has an enclosed walk of similar outline, with the added accent of four kidney-shaped planting beds at the outer corners, and the centrally featured stone capitol [sic].

Planting beds of this shape, fitted into the curves of the meandering walks, were popular ornamental planting adjuncts usually furnished with low shrubs, bulbs and annuals.

The use of elements was indicated on "Jefferson's plan of the winding or Roundabout Walk, flower borders, and beds, 1807." Note: 2 The curvilinear garden or park walk was widely used in laying out prospect-filled walks, especially for the ferme ornée depicted in a number of books owned by Jefferson. Thus it may have seemed a reasonable precedent to Alden Hopkins. At the scale in which it is produced in the narrow garden of Pavilion I, however, it is at best a miniaturization of an idea.

During his tour of gardens in England with John Adams in 1786, Jefferson noted at Blenheim: "at every here and there small thickets of shrubs, in oval raised beds, cultivated, and flowers among the shrubs. " Note: 3 At Woburn, he characterized the "pleasure garden" as "being merely a highly ornamented walk through and round the divisions of the farm and kitchen garden." Note: 4

Jefferson's correspondence with Bernard M'Mahon, cat 1775-1816, the seedsman at Philadelphia, is well documented. M'Mahon propagated seeds returned from the Lewis and Clark Expedition and wrote the landmark American Gardener's Calendar ( 1806). This work, published in eleven editions, contained the most pertinent horticultural knowledge for eastern North America. Essentially a horticultural handbook-cum-calendar, this work - rather than the "descriptions of early 19th century gardens," which were used as design sources for the present garden -probably provided the listings of plant materials used for the original garden of Pavilion I. Note: 5

The plantings are a combination of native and exotic plants, many of which were considered in the 1950s as appropriate for eighteenth and early nineteenth century gardens. Native species described in the important early illustrated botanical texts were often included in plant lists for restored gardens without consideration of the scale and size of these plants in small confined spaces such as those created by the reconstructed curving walls universally used for heat retention and forcing in kitchen gardens. Over time, it has been found that while many native species included in restoration plant lists command attention on the scale of their normal habitats they overwhelm their surroundings in smaller scale domestic spaces such as those of the Hopkins design for Pavilion I.

The following plants were included in the Hopkins design: Note: 6

Trees:
Pieris floribunda (Mountain Andromeda), Crataegus Phaenopyrum (Washington Thorn), Potentilla fruticosa (Bush Cinquefoil), Magnolia grandiflora (Southern Magnolia), Prunus laurocerasus (Cherry Laurel), Malus coronaria (Wild Sweet Crab), Pyracantha coccinea (Firethorn), Prunus cerasifera (var., Purple-leaved Plum), Rhododendron indicum (Indian Azalea), Prunus persica (var., Peach), Sambucus canadensis (Elderberry), Pyrus communis (var., Dwarf Pear), Spiraea cantoniensis (Reeves-Spiraea)
Shrubs:
Aucuba japonica variegata (Gold-Dust Tree), Calycnathus floridus (Carolina Sweetshrub), Chionanthus virginica (Fringe-Tree), Hypericum calycinum (St. John's-Wort), Nandina domestica (Nandina), Photinia serrulata (Photinia).
Vines:
Vitis labrusca (Fox Grape).
Roses:
Rosa eglanteria (Sweet Briar), Rosa laevigata (Cherokee Rose).

The 1952 pamphlet describes the reconstruction of the lower section of the Pavilion I garden as a kitchen garden of the early years of the university, before the professors were allotted land and paddock space farther away from their dwellings. Note: 7

The Hotel garden, i.e. the west, lower portion of Pavilion I garden, has been designed to express the possible culinary purpose for which it would have been developed to a design more in keeping with the earlier 18th century period of Bradley and Gentil. The two turf parterres (once given over to kitchen produce and dwarf pears), the encircling flowering peach trees, and the vines express the simplicity of this design. A decorative gateway in the rear west wall connects with the Hotel and the outer crosswalk.


Visually, this portion of the Hopkins design is especially logical as it relates to its position at the northwestern edge of an unprotected ridge. This garden would have been a short season garden spot under early nineteenth century cultivation techniques, even with the protecting walls.


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Last Modified: Wednesday, 07-Aug-1996 11:55:50 EDT